VANCOUVER — The Federal Court of Canada says the owners of a derelict barge in British Columbia have defaulted and must pay thousands in costs to the Canadian organization that funds the cleanup of marine pollution.Patricia Wilson, her company Jacobson Marine and Industrial Design, and co-owner Steen Larsen, have been ordered to pay almost $138,000 plus interest to the Ship-Source Oil Pollution Fund.The fund filed court action to recover its costs after the 60-metre barge Spudnik broke free of its moorings in Howe Sound, north of Vancouver, during high winds in November 2014.The oil pollution fund’s online file of the incident shows the rusting vessel was adrift and in peril of running aground, potentially spilling some of the 6,500 litres of diesel and lube oil aboard.Coast Guard officials quickly hired a tug to tow the barge to safety in New Westminster, where another firm was retained to remove all the contaminants aboard.Administrators of the fund paid all the bills by October 2016 and successfully sought a default judgement against Wilson and Larsen for reimbursement under polluter-pay legislation when the pair failed to respond to the court action.“The Defendants have failed to make any payment to the plaintiff to date in satisfaction of the principal or the interest accrued thereon,” says the Federal Court judgement released Tuesday.Wilson and Larsen have been found liable for expenses of $137,747 and interest of $3,891.17, while the judgement says further interest will accrue at a rate of 3.0% per year.

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“There is still an enormous amount of work ahead,” she said, noting that violence against women is everywhere, on every continent, in poor slums and in rich suburbs. “But if the challenge of ending violence against women remains monumental, it is at least no longer a lonely task,” she told European justice ministers yesterday at their meeting in Tromsø, Norway, which focused on breaking the silence of domestic violence. “More and more leaders around the world are joining the struggle. More and more individuals understand that any abuse of any woman is intolerable,” she said.Ms. Migiro stressed that domestic violence is “especially evil.” Surveys from around the world show that half of the women who die from homicides are killed by their current or former husbands or partners. “They lose their lives to gunshots, beatings, burns and other horrendous forms of abuse,” she stated. “This violence is pervasive and its effects are widespread. Not only are individual women victimized, but whole societies suffer major setbacks.”Breaking the silence that contributes to a culture of impunity, and protecting women and girls, will require “adopting new laws, enforcing the ones we have and working tirelessly to change the backward mindsets that condone, excuse or ignore violence committed against women.”She highlighted Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s UNiTE Campaign, which calls on world leaders to spur action through national campaigns and to achieve five key outcomes by 2015.“By then, we want all countries to have strong laws, action plans, preventive measures and data collection systems. These are the essential elements for stopping and defeating all forms of domestic violence,” she stated.Ms. Migiro added that the Secretary-General had made a personal commitment to this cause since the launching of the campaign, and since then has been using the power of his office to denounce violence against women and children.She recalled in particular Mr. Ban’s recent visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where he spoke to young victims of horrific crimes. The Deputy Secretary-General also met with a number of ministers and officials in Oslo during her five-day visit to Norway which wrapped up today. 19 June 2009Deputy Secretary-General Asha-Rose Migiro has pledged the support of the United Nations in ending violence against women, which she said will require adopting new laws, enforcing the ones that exist and working to change the backward mindsets that contribute to this scourge.

“We are working full steam to meet this deadline,” Salim Ahmed Salim, the AU special envoy and chief mediator for the inter-Sudanese talks in Abuja, Nigeria, said in his first Council briefing since January, when he said talks between the Government and rebel movements were proceeding at an “agonizing slow pace.”“As we enter the home stretch of this marathon negotiating session,” he cautioned, however, “the anxieties of the Parties are understandably intensifying.” Concessions still need to be made on the sharing of wealth and power, security arrangements and other issues, he said.The security arrangements will make or break the negotiations, he said, underscoring the complexity of both an immediate ceasefire and long-term final status arrangements. “Darfur is home to a myriad of armed and dangerous militia, included the Janjaweed, the armed movements that are fragmenting, bandits of sorts, foreign combatants and tribal forces,” he observed.The mediation team, he said, had made proposals on the disengagement of forces, disarmament of the Janjaweed, the control and neutralization of militias, protection of displaced persons, security of nomadic migration corridors and the demilitarization of humanitarian supply routes.The proposed “Enhanced Ceasefire Agreement” stipulates that the neutralization of the Janjaweed and “undisciplined militia” is a prerequisite for any peace agreement, he said.As this, and all such steps, will have to be monitored by the AU Mission in Sudan (AMIS), he stressed that it was crucial to follow up any peace agreement, once signed, with maximum support to those forces, which are not even adequate to fulfil their current mandate.“My plea to you in this esteemed Council, is that you do not wait for the transition to take place from AMIS to a UN Force before strengthening the implementation mechanism of any agreement to be reached in Abuja,” he said.

The Latest: Charges planned against Jill Stein from protest by The Associated Press Posted Sep 6, 2016 6:39 pm MDT Last Updated Sep 6, 2016 at 7:21 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email WASHINGTON – The Latest on legal proceedings involving the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline (all times local):8 p.m.North Dakota authorities plan to pursue charges against Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein for spray-painting construction equipment at a Dakota Access Pipeline protest.Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said Tuesday that the charges would be for trespassing and vandalism. State court records Tuesday evening didn’t yet list any formal counts against Stein.A spokeswoman for Stein says that activists invited her to leave a message at the protest site. She says Stein wrote “I approve this message” in red spray paint on the blade of a bulldozer.Stein, who is anti-war and advocates for clean energy, camped out with protesters Monday evening.___6:20 p.m.Authorities say law enforcement officers responding to protesters at a Dakota Access Pipeline construction area on private property in North Dakota pulled back because they determined it wasn’t safe to respond.Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier says the primary goal is public safety, including for law enforcement. Authorities also are looking into a report of a drone flying overhead.Authorities say a group of between 150 and 200 protesters, including some carrying hatchets and knives, gathered at the construction area Tuesday morning. Officials say two protesters were secured to heavy equipment.No pipeline workers were at the site, and no arrests have been made.___5:40 p.m.The chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says a federal judge’s decision to temporarily stop work on some, but not all, of a portion of the Dakota Access Pipeline puts his people’s sacred places “at further risk of ruin and desecration.”U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said Tuesday that work will temporarily stop between State Highway 1806 and 20 miles east of Lake Oahe, but that work will continue west of the highway.Chairman Dave Archambault II said in a statement that the tribe is disappointed that the judge’s decision doesn’t stop the destruction of sacred sites while the tribe waits for a different ruling.Boasberg said he’ll issue a decision by the end of Friday on the tribe’s broader push that challenges federal regulators’ decision to grant permits.___5:15 p.m.An attorney for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says it is grateful that work will be temporarily stopped on a section of the four-state oil pipeline.U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said Tuesday that work will temporarily stop between State Highway 1806 and 20 miles east of Lake Oahe, but that work will continue west of the highway because he believes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lacks jurisdiction on private land.The tribe requested the stoppage after a weekend confrontation between protesters and construction workers near Lake Oahe due to workers allegedly bulldozing sites that attorney Jan Hasselman said were “of great historic and cultural significance to the tribe.”Hasselman said Tuesday that the tribe was “disappointed that some of the important sacred sites that we had found and provided evidence for will not be protected.”Boasberg said he’ll issue a decision by the end of Friday on the tribe’s broader push that challenges federal regulators’ decision to grant permits.___4:55 p.m.A Dakota Access attorney says if there weren’t disturbances on the section of the oil pipeline that was part of a federal judge’s decision, it would be completed by the end of the week.Attorney Bill Leone said during Tuesday’s hearing that there are 700 people constructing the pipeline in North Dakota. He also said that there were two more attacks on crews Tuesday.A weekend confrontation between protesters and construction workers near Lake Oahe prompted the tribe to ask Sunday for a temporary stop of construction, which a judge partially granted Tuesday.A spokeswoman for the Morton County Sheriff’s Office, a spokeswoman for Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners and a spokesman of environmental group Earthjustice didn’t immediately respond to telephone messages requesting comment.Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II is expected to release a statement on Facebook later Tuesday.___3:45 p.m.Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein has spray-painted construction equipment at a protest site in North Dakota against the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline.A spokeswoman for Stein said Tuesday that activists invited her to leave a message at the protest site. Stein wrote “I approve this message” in red spray paint on the blade of a bulldozer.Stein, who is anti-war and advocates for clean energy, camped out with protesters Monday evening.A federal judge granted the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s request Tuesday to temporarily stop work on some, but not all of a portion of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline to safeguard cultural sites in North Dakota. He said he will issue a full opinion on the tribe’s broader push that challenges federal regulators’ decision to grant permits to the operators of the pipeline by Friday night.___4:35 p.m.A federal judge has granted the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s request to temporarily stop work on some, but not all of a portion of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline to safeguard cultural sites in North Dakota.U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said Tuesday that work will temporarily stop between State Highway 1806 and 20 miles east of Lake Oahe, but that work will continue west of the highway because he believes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lacks jurisdiction on private land.The request granted by Boasberg is different than the tribe’s broader push that challenges federal regulators’ decision to grant permits to the operators of the four-state pipeline. Boasberg said he expects to issue a full opinion on that lawsuit by the end of Friday.A weekend confrontation between protesters and construction workers near Lake Oahe, North Dakota, prompted the tribe to ask Sunday for a temporary stop of construction.Attorneys for Energy Transfer Partners filed court documents Tuesday morning denying that workers have destroyed any cultural sites.___12:20 p.m.The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline says in a court filing that it opposes the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s request for a temporary work stoppage in North Dakota.The tribe wants a federal judge to halt construction in the southern part of the state to prevent the destruction of sacred and culturally significant sites. The request came after Saturday’s skirmish between pipeline workers and protesters.A hearing is scheduled Tuesday in Washington, D.C.Attorneys for Energy Transfer Partners filed court documents Tuesday denying that workers have destroyed any cultural sites.The Army Corps of Engineers said in court documents that said it won’t oppose the tribe’s request in the interest of “preserving peace.”The judge is weighing a broader challenge to federal permits granted for the pipeline, and has said he’ll rule by Friday.___9 a.m.The Army Corps of Engineers won’t oppose the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s request for a temporary work stoppage on part of the Dakota Access Pipeline.The tribe has requested a halt to the construction of a 2-mile stretch of the pipeline near Lake Oahe, North Dakota, to prevent the destruction of sacred and culturally significant sites.A hearing is scheduled Tuesday in Washington, D.C.A protest of the $3.8 billion oil pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois turned violent on Saturday. Court documents filed Monday say the Corps “acknowledges that the public interest would be served by preserving peace near Lake Oahe.”The pipeline company hasn’t responded to the tribe’s motion.The judge will also consider the tribe’s challenge to permits for the pipeline granted by the Corps. A decision is expected by Friday.

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