first_imgOn May 17, 2015, John Kavairlook, Jr. was shot and killed in the parking lot in front of Walgreens after an altercation at the Rock N Rodeo Bar. He is one of the cases Fairbanks police are seeking help with using a new website. Photo: City of Fairbanks.The city of Fairbanks has launched a new web page to share and generate information about unsolved murder cases.  Local police are tracking cases ranging from months to decades old.Download AudioThe new section of the city of Fairbanks web site covers 14 cases dating back to 1983, when the city began keeping reliable records. Detective Peyton Meredith updated the city council on the cases, including the murder of John Kavairlook Jr. outside a local bar in May.“This is not a cold case. This is an unsolved case that we’re currently working on. It’s one of those ‘slow but steady wins the race’ cases, but we’re getting there. It’s only been a couple of months,” Meredith says.Detective Meredith also pointed to the a few other cases he says city police have made progress on, including the 2004 killing of Edward Sikvayuguk in a camp off Trainor Gate Road.“Edward Sikvayuguk? I know who killed him,” Meredith says. “To be bluntly honest right now, that case needs to be resubmitted to the district attorney’s office. Period.”Meredith described the 2003 murder of Fela Avery, who was found shot dead off the Old Richardson Highway, as the most solvable of the cold cases.“It’s going to take some time. It takes a little bit of effort. We know where the suspect is; there’s a lot of evidence in that case… it’s just kind of missing that one little piece to put it all together.”Three city police detectives are responsible investigating unsolved cases as well as all other violent crimes in the city, a work load that often leave little time for the older cases.   Meredith described what motivates the detectives.“Finding justice for these families – and not only the victims, but their brothers and sisters we stay in contact with.”Detective Meredith only provided cursory details about the active cases.  City spokeswoman Amber Courtney stressed that police can only share case information with the public that does not endanger detective’s ability to investigate.last_img

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first_imgJubilee Hills: Basavatarakam Indo American Cancer Hospital & Research Institute launched highly advanced breast cancer diagnostic machine that can detect breast cancers as small 1 mm size.It is the most sensitive and specific breast imaging technology with 50 microns image resolution, least radiation and extremely comfortable breast compression device. In 3D Mammography, multiple images of the breast are obtained at 1 mm intervals unlike the conventional mammogram where entire breast is viewed in a single image. Also Read – Golden 90’s Music Superstars – Alka Yagnik & Kumar Sanu LIVE in Concert will be performing together for the very 1st time in the city of pearls,… Advertise With Us This enables better detection and characterization of smaller cancers, micro-calcifications and premalignant lesions (DCIS), which may be overlooked in a conventional mammogram. In spite of multiple sections, the time taken for the procedure remains essentially the same (4 seconds). Dr Tulasi Devi Polavarapu, Member, Board of Trustees, BIACH&RI said, “Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the world and about 1,55,000 new cases are detected annually in India.” She expressed concern that the recent Breast cancer projection states that the total number of cases would go as high as 18 lakhs by 2020.last_img

first_img Ko works at the University of California, Berkeley. Along with Heng Pan, Sang Ryu, Nipun Misra and Costas Grigoropoulos at Berkeley, and Hee Park at AppliFlex in Mountain View, California, Ko believes that a solution may have been found. The team created a LIFT-based process called Nanomaterial Enabled Laser Transfer (NELT) in order to create direct patterning process resulting in a high resolution while transferring the organic light emitting diode (OLED) without damage. Their work is described in Applied Physics Letters: “Nanomaterial enabled laser transfer for organic light emitting material direct writing.”“NELT process can be used for any kinds of heat sensitive organic material direct patterning and transfer,” Ko explains. “NELT process can achieve more versatile laser wavelength selection with one or two order smaller laser energy than conventional LIFT processes by introducing a specially engineered nanoparticle layer as a laser absorbing and dynamic release layer.” Organic material is delicate, and can be easily damaged by intense heat from lasers. This is what makes the LIFT process, which relies on high temperatures for the proper pressure for transfer, of dubious worth in terms of advancing OLED technology.The nanoparticle layer is what mainly absorbs the laser wavelength. Because of its weak interaction with the organic material, there is less potential for damage. “[N]anomaterials exhibit remarkable properties that may be substantially different from those observed in the bulk counterparts,” Ko says. He also points out that the NELT process uses less energy than the LIFT processes currently considered conventional for direct writing.Among the more interesting applications for the NELT process is the possibility of flexible displays. “Flexible displays are built on flexible substrates so that they can be bent or folded just like a paper. They are futuristic displays usually found in the sci-fi movies.” Ko then continues with additional possible applications for this work: “Other applications include very large area organic light emitting diode display, active material transfer such as semiconducting polymer for organic field effect transfer for organic electronics, and biological material direct transfer for bio-sensor application.”Even with this advance, however, more is required, especially in terms of flexible display. Ko says that a transistor is needed in addition to the light-emitting portion of the display. “Currently we have successfully demonstrated a light emitting diode material direct patterning and transfer by NELT process and several direct writing methods for organic field effect transistor arrays on a polymer substrate. Now we plan to develop a novel approach to integrate organic light emitting diode and organic field effect transistor to demonstrate a working flexible display.”Science fiction may be moving a little closer to becoming science fact.Publication: Nanomaterial enabled laser transfer for organic light emitting material direct writing, Seung H. Ko, Heng Pan, Sang G. Ryu, Nipun Misra, Costas P. Grigoropoulos, and Hee K. Park, Applied Physics Letters online publication 15/10/2008. link.aip.org/link/?APPLAB/93/151110/1Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Researchers image molecules as they change charge states for first time (PhysOrg.com) — One of the more interesting methods of pattern transfer available for a number of applications right now is Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT). However, when working with organic material, there are some drawbacks to LIFT, as well as other drawbacks to making use of a high threshold UV or IR laser to effect the transfer. “Besides thermal degradation,” Seung Hwan Ko tells PhysOrg.com, “high laser threshold laser can also induce mechanical cracks on transfer material and problems in edge sharpness.”center_img Citation: Flexible OLED display one-step closer with organic light emitting material direct writing (2008, October 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-10-flexible-oled-one-step-closer-emitting.html Explore furtherlast_img

first_img Remotely operated vehicle finds heterotrophs abundant in deepest part of the ocean This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Credit: Oliver Plümper, Utrecht University Explore further Citation: Possible signs of life found ten kilometers below seafloor (2017, April 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-04-life-ten-kilometers-seafloor.html The Mariana Trench is the deepest part of any of the world’s oceans. Its lowest point is 10,994 meters below sea level. It is located southwest of Japan, and has been an area of scrutiny ever since the development of underwater pilotless craft called Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs). Prior research has shown that the trench formed due to the Pacific tectonic plate sliding beneath the Philippines plate, making it a subduction zone. In this new effort, the researchers used an ROV to extract 46 samples of serpentine from the ocean floor near the South Chamorro mud volcano, which they brought back to their lab for study.Serpentine is a mineral that forms when olivine in the upper mantle meets water pushed up from a subduction zone. Such reactions produce methane gas and hydrogen, which the researchers note could be used as a food source by microbes. Serpentine is pushed to the surface of the sea floor by hydrothermal vents, where the researchers found it.Upon examination of their serpentine samples, the researchers found trace amounts of organic material that was very similar to that produced by microbes living in more accessible places. That suggests, the team notes, it is possible that the serpentine samples are evidence of life living far below the surface. The team used data from prior studies to calculate how far below the sea floor the serpentine was formed, which allowed them estimate just how far down the possible microbes might live—approximately ten kilometers below the sea floor.The team acknowledges that their findings are not proof of life below the sea floor; other processes have been known to produce both serpentine and the organic matter, but, they note, it does suggest it is possible.center_img More information: Oliver Plümper et al. Subduction zone forearc serpentinites as incubators for deep microbial life, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1612147114AbstractSerpentinization-fueled systems in the cool, hydrated forearc mantle of subduction zones may provide an environment that supports deep chemolithoautotrophic life. Here, we examine serpentinite clasts expelled from mud volcanoes above the Izu–Bonin–Mariana subduction zone forearc (Pacific Ocean) that contain complex organic matter and nanosized Ni–Fe alloys. Using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the organic matter consists of a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and functional groups such as amides. Although an abiotic or subduction slab-derived fluid origin cannot be excluded, the similarities between the molecular signatures identified in the clasts and those of bacteria-derived biopolymers from other serpentinizing systems hint at the possibility of deep microbial life within the forearc. To test this hypothesis, we coupled the currently known temperature limit for life, 122 °C, with a heat conduction model that predicts a potential depth limit for life within the forearc at ∼10,000 m below the seafloor. This is deeper than the 122 °C isotherm in known oceanic serpentinizing regions and an order of magnitude deeper than the downhole temperature at the serpentinized Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We suggest that the organic-rich serpentinites may be indicators for microbial life deep within or below the mud volcano. Thus, the hydrated forearc mantle may represent one of Earth’s largest hidden microbial ecosystems. These types of protected ecosystems may have allowed the deep biosphere to thrive, despite violent phases during Earth’s history such as the late heavy bombardment and global mass extinctions. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found possible evidence of life ten kilometers below the sea floor in the Mariana Trench. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes samples of serpentine they collected from hydrothermal vents and the material they found in it that offers evidence of life living farther below the surface than was thought. © 2017 Phys.orglast_img

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