first_imgNew Delhi: With the Congress alleging that the Election Commission of India (EC) has taken a ‘soft’ stand on Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath and Niti Aayog Vice-Chairman Rajiv Kumar for model code of conduct violations, the credibility of the EC has come under the scanner. Terming the incident “very unfortunate”, Congress leaders have questioned the apex poll panel for writing a ‘love letter’ to let off the poll code violator Yogi with a light rap for his “Modiji ki sena” remark. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsSimilarly, in the case of model poll code violation by Rajasthan Governor Kalyan Singh, the Congress has demanded the resignation of Singh citing the EC’s indictment. “Rajasthan Governor Kalyan Singh and Niti Aayog Vice-Chairman Rajiv Kumar have no right to remain in office after their indictment by the EC for poll code violations,” senior Congress leader P Chidambaram said on Saturday. Notably, on Friday, the EC had expressed ‘displeasure’ over the NITI Aayog vice-chairman’s remarks against the Congress’ proposed minimum income scheme ‘NYAY’. The poll panel had on Monday said that Singh’s remarks supporting the return of Narendra Modi as prime minister were violative of the model code. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayRaising questions over the responsibility of the poll panel, Congress spokesperson Randeep Singh Surjewala said, “Has the MCC now become ‘Modi code of conduct’?” Taking a dig at the EC move of going ‘soft’ on MCC violators, Surjewala said, “The Uttar Pradesh chief minister ‘insults’ the Indian Army and the poll body write a ‘love letter’ to him.” Speaking about NITI Aayog Vice-Chairman Rajiv Kumar, who had criticised the Congress-proposed minimum income scheme NYAY (Nyunatam Aay Yojana), Surjewala said, “NITI Aayog V-C criticises the NYAY scheme and EC says “don’t do it again in future”. “Given that the EC has preventive powers and not punitive powers, so by exercising it, the poll panel could have recommended suspension of Niti Aayog V-C Rajiv Kumar as was done in the 1995 assembly election in Bihar and in 1998 parliamentary election,” an expert said. “The EC had recommended suspension of the then Gaya district magistrate Rajbala Verma for allegedly mishandling the 1995 Assembly elections. Unfortunately, the Bihar government had removed Verma after the completion of the election process,” the expert said, adding that in a similar case, then Gaya DM SM Raju was immediately suspended on charge of laxity in the discharge of electoral responsibilities during the 1998 general elections.last_img read more

Nvidia Corp on Monday cut its fourth-quarter revenue estimate by half a billion dollars due to weak demand for its gaming chips in China and lower-than-expected datacentre sales, sending its shares sliding 13 per cent.“Q4 was an extraordinary, unusually turbulent, and disappointing quarter,” said Chief Executive Officer Jensen Huang said.A raft of earnings, analyst notes and market commentary in recent weeks have confirmed that a slowdown in the world’s No.2 economy, exacerbated by an ongoing trade war with the United States, will continue to squeeze sales and profits at technology companies. Chinese investment in Canada cut by nearly half as diplomatic spats, currency controls take toll Stocks around the world fell after China revealed worst growth since the financial crisis China’s slowdown looms just as the world needs its growth the most The company forecast revenue of US$2.20 billion for the quarter ended Jan. 27, down from its earlier forecast of US$2.70 billion. Both numbers were plus or minus 2 per cent.Analysts on average had forecast revenue of US$2.7 billion, according to Refinitiv data from IBES.Nvidia said sales of its next generation “Turing” graphic chips were also below expectations as some customers delayed their purchases.The company will report its fourth quarter results on Feb. 14.© Thomson Reuters 2019 read more

CALGARY — Canada’s largest farm equipment dealer says it expects to make fewer sales of new products in the second half of the year because of higher prices attributed to U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum and the lower value of the Canadian dollar.Rocky Mountain Dealerships Inc. says it doesn’t expect to repeat the record level of new equipment sales it posted in the three months ended June 30 as farmers were able to afford new combines and tractors thanks to last year’s bumper crops.On a conference call, CEO Garrett Ganden said rising prices for equipment made in the United States will likely steer more buyers into the used equipment areas at his company’s three dozen dealerships in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba in the latter half of the year.He said the company’s large inventory of used equipment accepted as trade-ins for new, however, should allow sales revenue to continue at normal levels.Rocky Mountain reported second-quarter net earnings of $6.1 million or 31 cents per share on sales of $303 million, up from a profit of $4.9 million or 25 cents on sales of $237 million in the year-earlier period.It said new equipment sales increased 46 per cent compared with the second quarter of 2017 and used equipment sales were up 18 per cent.“As we look towards the second half of 2018, we are beginning to see the impacts of tariffs and a weaker Canadian dollar being reflected in new equipment pricing,” said Ganden.“While likely to moderate new equipment sales growth to an extent, increased pricing may encourage our customers to consider used equipment as a more cost-effective alternative.” read more

Yankee Stadium513/31/19New York Yankees vs. Baltimore Orioles67 Chicago Cubs outfielder Albert Almora Jr. hit a 106 mph line drive in May that screamed into foul territory down the left-field line at Houston’s Minute Maid Park. The ball hit a 2-year-old girl, who was rushed out of the stadium. The game stopped as an emotional Almora dropped to a knee. Less than two weeks later, as the Washington Nationals played the White Sox in Chicago, a woman sitting just past the third-base dugout was struck in the face. Less than two weeks after that, a Dodger Stadium spectator sitting just past the netting on the first-base line was hit in the head by a hard line drive off the bat of right fielder Cody Bellinger.Bloomberg News estimated in 2014 that 1,750 fans per year are hurt by batted balls at MLB games. Amid debates over how much protection teams should offer spectators, we wanted to find out which areas of stadiums might be the most dangerous, which could help us figure out what could be done to prevent more fan injuries.Because there’s no central database of all of MLB’s foul balls, we had to compile a data set ourselves. To do that, we searched the batted-ball data for this season on Baseball Savant to find the 10 stadiums that produced the most foul balls up to June 5 and then analyzed the pitch-level data from the most foul-heavy game day at each of those stadiums (including one doubleheader). Because we had to individually research each foul ball, we couldn’t look at a whole season’s worth of fouls. By limiting the data set to the most foul-heavy days of play in those 10 stadiums, we aimed to keep the data set to a manageable size while also capturing the largest number of fouls we could from a variety of parks, since stadiums vary dramatically in architecture, altitude and seating arrangements. T-Mobile Park535/18/19Seattle Mariners vs. Minnesota Twins100 PNC Park576/1/19Pittsburgh Pirates vs. Milwaukee Brewers111 Dodger Stadium513/29/19Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona Diamondsbacks86 Citizens Bank Park534/27/19Philadelphia Phillies vs. Miami Marlins75 StadiumAverage No. of Fouls per gameDateMatchupNo. of Fouls Most foul-heavy day * Includes both games of the doubleheaderSource: Baseball Savant Globe Life Park555/3/19Texas Rangers vs. Toronto Blue Jays87 Miller Park555/4/19Milwaukee Brewers vs. New York Mets85 Major league stadiums have slowly been installing more netting around the field. Players have been pushing the issue, including Dodgers pitcher Rich Hill, who called the MLB Players Association to voice his support for more protective netting. In 2015, MLB encouraged teams to extend netting to the “near ends of both dugouts.” By 2018, all 30 stadiums had exceeded that recommendation, installing netting from one end of the dugout to the other. After the incident at Guaranteed Rate Field, the White Sox announced that they would implement netting from foul pole to foul pole, and crews worked during the All-Star break to install the new nets. The Washington Nationals also used the break to add netting.But more netting won’t protect every fan. Linda Goldbloom was sitting high above home plate in Dodger Stadium — in zone 1, where netting is provided — last year when she was struck and killed by a high fly ball that had an exit velocity of just 73 mph. And a woman at Tropicana Field was hospitalized in 2016 after she was hit by a fly ball that found its way through a hole in the netting just to the left of the first-base dugout.The efforts that other leagues make to ensure the safety of their spectators could serve as a blueprint for MLB. Take the Japanese Nippon Professional Baseball Organization, where the stadiums have netting from foul pole to foul pole. Whenever a ball is hit into the stands, fans are warned with loud whistles blown by staff stationed in their seating section, and animated warning videos are played before every game. As a result, unprotected seats are something of a luxury in Japan. The Tokyo Dome offers “exciting seats” near the foul lines, which come equipped with helmets and gloves.Even with extensive netting, no one will ever be completely safe at a baseball game. But there are ways for MLB to protect its fans from foul balls — particularly in the most dangerous areas of the park.“It’s something that you just hold your breath for a second,” Hill told The Los Angeles Times. “You just hope it hits a seat, not a person.”Neil Paine contributed research.Check out our latest MLB predictions.CORRECTION (July 15, 2019, 5 p.m.): A previous version of this story referred to the data as having been collected from the 10 most foul-ball-heavy games this season. It was actually collected from the 10 most foul-ball-heavy game days — one day included a doubleheader. SunTrust Park534/14/19Atlanta Braves vs. New York Mets73 Dozens of fouls per game in the most foul-heavy parksThe most foul-heavy day at each of the 10 stadiums that produced the most fouls this season, as of June 5 Oakland Coliseum536/2/19Oakland A’s vs. Houston Astros109 Less than half of the foul balls we charted were followed by a camera to where they landed. But by gauging angles,2After watching a lot of fouls with accompanying footage. we estimated where all of the fouls — both those that were followed by a camera and those that weren’t — likely landed. We tested our predictions against the footage of the balls that were followed to check our accuracy.3Our predictions were correct on 381 of the 393 balls that cameras followed in these games, for a success rate of 96.9 percent.Nearly equal shares of foul balls ended up in zones with netting vs. zones that largely lack netting: 454 balls landed in zones 1, 2 and 3, while 452 balls fell in zones 4 through 7.The scariest foul balls are those with high exit velocities, particularly the line drives, which give spectators only seconds — or fractions of a second — to react. Statcast was able to measure exit velocities for 580 of the 906 foul balls in our data set, and most of the hardest-hit of those 580 landed in areas that are primarily unprotected. Of the fly balls with recorded exit velocities of 90 mph or higher, 71.8 percent landed in zones 4 and 5.4That is partly the result of the limitations of the data. Balls hit directly into the net in zones 1 through 3 were more likely to be missing exit velocities, and it was more difficult to interpret the trajectories of balls hit to those areas. And all of the line drives that left the bat at 90 mph or more landed in those same zones. That’s the type of hit that injured the toddler at this year’s Cubs-Astros game or that blinded a man in one eye at Wrigley Field in 2017. Camden Yards*574/20/19Baltimore Orioles vs. Minnesota Twins113 We watched clips of 906 foul balls hit during those games (excluding foul tips, which were never in danger of reaching the stands, and fouls that resulted in outs, because Baseball Savant groups those with other types of caught-ball outs, so we couldn’t get data on foul outs specifically), and we recorded whether the fouls were grounders, fly balls, line drives or pop-ups. Then we split the parks into “zones” to categorize the general area where each of those balls landed.Zones 1, 2 and 3 include seats that are largely protected by netting — the area behind home plate and both dugouts — along with the corresponding areas of foul territory on the field. Zones 4 and 5 are mostly non-netted seating areas1Some parks do extend netting into zones 4 and 5. and the foul territory outside the baselines, from the dugout to the foul pole. Zones 6 and 7 cover the areas past the foul poles; the fly balls that land here typically have too much arc to be dangerous, and line drives rarely make it that far. read more

OSU senior forward Marc Loving drives to the hoop against Navy in Annapolis, Maryland, on Nov. 11. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorLast time the Ohio State men’s basketball team took on Michigan State, sophomore guard JaQuan Lyle for the Buckeyes stole the show. This time out, senior guard Alvin Ellis III of Michigan State was the man with the hot hand, helping lead the Spartans to a 74-66 win.Ellis finished his game with 18 points, and was 6 of 9 from 3-point range. Early on, when the Spartans had a 21-14 lead, the senior guard had more points that the Buckeyes entire team (15).Lyle, who missed the team’s last game due to a family emergency, returned to the Buckeyes lineup. The sophomore came off the bench behind sophomore guard C.J. Jackson, and picked up 10 points, seven rebounds and five assists.OSU could never quite find a way to gain enough momentum to get in front of Michigan State, leading for a meager 42 seconds. Even with a big night for senior forward Marc Loving, who had 22 points, it wasn’t meant to be for the Buckeyes.Michigan State capitalized frequently off of the fast break, picking up 20 points to OSU’s four. OSU’s final lead came when Lyle knocked down a jumper and a free throw to give the Buckeyes a 27-25 lead, but Michigan State would not be denied.Freshman guard/forward Miles Bridges picked up 17 points and 11 rebounds, and freshman forward Nick Ward added 15 points for the Spartans. OSU redshirt junior center Trevor Thompson, the normal offensive threat for the Buckeyes, had little impact dealing with foul trouble, picking up just six points and seven rebounds.In a rare occurrence this season, OSU was outrebounded. Michigan State pulled down 39 boards, while the Buckeyes could only manage 33.As OSU attempted to make an improbable comeback late, a putback slam by freshman guard Joshua Langford with just 1:34 left in the game effectively dashed OSU’s hopes.Although the turnover battle swung in favor of OSU coach Thad Matta, the fast-paced and hard offense of coach Tom Izzo and Michigan State was too much for the struggling Buckeyes to overcome.OSU is now 15-12 this season, and 5-9 in the Big Ten. Michigan State is now 16-10, and 8-5 in conference play, with momentum on its side with just a few weeks remaining in the regular season.Up NextThe Buckeyes return to the Schottenstein Center to play Nebraska on Saturday at 6 p.m. read more

OSU freshman forward Marcus McCrary pushes the ball upfield in a game against Rutgers Oct. 25 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won 4-1. Credit: Ed Momot / For The LanternWith a win Saturday in College Park, Md., the Ohio State men’s soccer team would have been able to set its sights on the top seed in the Big Ten, knowing that it will be playing at home in postseason play.Instead, the status of OSU’s quarterfinal game on Nov. 9 now appears a little murkier.The Buckeyes (7-6-4, 4-3-0) fell to Maryland (10-5-2, 4-2-1), 1-0, in a game in which they were stifled by the Terrapin defense.Freshman forward George Campbell scored the decisive goal in the 75th minute to break the scoreless tie. Maryland capitalized off a corner kick, dishing it twice in the box before Campbell knocked it past OSU redshirt-senior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov for his second goal of the season.Ivanov made six saves in the defeat, but his offense was unable to garner any support through the Maryland defense.Maryland outshot OSU by a count of 13-4 for the game, including holding the Buckeyes without a shot for the entirety of the first half.Two of OSU’s four shots were on the mark, as freshman forward Marcus McCrary and sophomore defender Austin Bergstrom got attempts in on Maryland sophomore goalkeeper Zack Steffen in the second half, but Steffen stopped both.The shutout was Steffen’s seventh of the season, including his fourth during the Terrapin’s current seven-game winning streak.The loss caused OSU to be jumped by Maryland in the Big Ten standings. OSU sits in a tie for third with Northwestern at 12 points, one point in front of Michigan State, Indiana and Michigan, who are tied for fifth.In order to host its quarterfinal game at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium, OSU needs to finish in the top four of the conference. A win in its last game against Michigan would clinch the Buckeyes a trip back to Columbus – something they could have accomplished by beating Maryland.Beating the Terrapins would have put OSU in a tie with Penn State for the top spot in the conference with 15 points, though the Nittany Lions would hold the tiebreaker after beating the Buckeyes, 1-0, on Sept. 21.OSU is set to look to grab a crucial victory when it travels to Ann Arbor, Mich., on Wednesday to wrap up its regular season. That game is scheduled to begin at 7:30 p.m. read more

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedCrescent for Shawwal sighted, EID will be celebrated on Friday- CIOGJune 14, 2018In “latest news”Eid-ul-Fitr messages 2018June 15, 2018In “latest news”The Holy Month of Ramadan fosters appreciation of differences -President Granger tells gathering at CIOG’s Iftar dinnerJune 19, 2017In “latest news” The Central Islamic Organisation of Guyana (CIOG) says that the crescent for Ramadan has been sighted; therefore fasting for all Muslims begins on Thursday 17 May, 2018.Taraweeh prayers will commence this evening Wednesday 16 May 2018.President of the CIOG, Al-Hajj Shahabudeen Ahmad in extending Ramadan Greetings said during this Ramadan, “let us reflect on the meaning of Al-Ubudiyyah–to become a true slave of Allah (SWT) — for it is only when we align our will in accordance with the will of our Creator that we can achieve fulfillment of purpose and true inner peace.”“Allah (SWT), our Creator, is the source of all Peace and Happiness. Tobe closer to Allah (SWT), we must gain wisdom and purify ourselves(Quran 62:2). Ramadan aids us with this, for Ramadan is the month in which the Holy Quran was revealed as a guide to mankind, and Ramadan is the month that requires us to fast, which purifies us physically and spiritually.”According to the  CIOG President, fasting achieves many benefits, including increased self-restraint, improvement of health by eliminating impurities from the body, and increased compassion for the difficulties faced by the sick, hungry, and needy.But, the ultimate benefit of fasting, he outlined, is the opportunity to distance ourselves from worldly distractions, to purify our inner selves, and to reflect on the teachings of the Holy Quran, so that we can draw closer to Allah (SWT), the source of Peace, Happiness, and Protection. “Let us resolve to make full use of the opportunity provided by the Holy month of Ramadan to act according to the teachings of the Quran, to cleanse ourselves, and to overcome our nafs.  Let us resolve to feed our souls while we fast our bodies. Let us resolve to act with kindness and compassion to all of Allah’s creation…Let us try our best to make peace with our family members, neighbors and fellow citizens. Let us visit the sick and pray for them. Let us extend our mercy to the orphans in our community. Let us help the widows and elderly people in society. Let us be kind and compassionate to animals. Let us be caring of our environment, the trees and plants that provide us with oxygen and sustenance. These actions will earn us Allah’s forgiveness and mercy; this is what Ramadan stands for” said Al-Hajj Shahabudeen Ahmad. read more

first_imgThe Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) stated that it deplores attempts by parts of the union movement and the New South Wales (NSW) Government to falsely portray Australia’s Prime Minister, the Hon John Howard MP’s commitment to regulatory reform in the minerals industry as undermining mine safety standards. “This is simply an ideologically driven attempt to distract from the real agenda” said MCA Chief Executive, Mitchell H. Hooke.“Australia’s regulatory systems governing the minerals industry in occupational health and safety and project approvals are now so excessive and complex, so inconsistent across and within jurisdictions, and so disaggregated from progressive, modern company practice, that they have become a capacity constraint in themselves,” Hooke said. “Any suggestion that industry would accept any diminution in mine safety standards could not be further from the truth. And, the Prime Minister clearly shares the minerals industry’s commitment to the absolute safety and health of its workforce and the community in which it operates. There cannot be any reduction in safety standards, but there must be reform to occupational health and safety regulatory systems across all jurisdictions if the industry is to achieve its goal of zero harm in the workplace. “We are short of our goal of zero harm, and frustrated by the inefficiencies of the existing outmoded, prescriptive, complex, inconsistent and often punitive State regulatory systems. Even so”, Hooke said, “over the decade to 2005-06, the industry’s safety performance has improved markedly on every key performance indicator:”Total lost time injury frequency rate (LTIFR) has declined by nearly 90% from 25 to 3 (LTIFR is the number of lost time injuries per million man hours worked)Fatalities over the same period have decreased by around 66% from 32 to 11Total recordable injury frequency rate (only recorded from 2003 through to 2006) has dropped by around 60% from 36 to 15 (again, this is per million man hours worked and includes all injuries except first aid cases).The MCA and its State counterparts have assiduously advocated that Governments should provide a regulatory framework that:Encourages a safety culture and promotes the sharing of information on fatalities, injuries and significant incidentsProvides before the fact prevention, rather than punitive after the fact retributionIs nationally consistent and risk basedEstablishes a responsibility of the employer to provide a safe working environment that harnesses responsibility and personal accountability of the individual for their actions.Hooke said: “It is vital that regulatory systems do not absolve the individual of personal accountability for safety and health by transferring that responsibility to the regulator, or indeed, to the employer. And we are vehemently opposed to a separate statutory offence of industrial manslaughter which automatically assigns guilt to the company/management in removing the test of gross negligence or willful misconduct and mitigates against the assignment of responsibility to other affected parties (organisations or individuals).“We fully endorse the Prime Minister’s intervention to add vital impetus and substance to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) reform agenda, as determined at its meeting of 10 February 2006. Those with a vested interest in the archaic regulation and practices of the past continue to seek to stymie critical reforms agreed though the COAG process. Actions by some in the union movement appear motivated more by ‘relevance deprivation’ than by supporting reforms for continuous improvement in workplace health and safety.“Critically, at the February 2006 meeting, all Governments agreed to accelerate the reform processes of the National Mine Safety Framework (NMSF). The NMSF was established five years ago under the Federal/State Government Ministerial Council on Mining and Petroleum Resources to drive the regulatory reforms industry is advocating. Yet, this process has gone nowhere.“Equally, we fully endorse the Prime Ministers commitment to improving the project approval system for more efficient and nationally consistent exploration and mining developments, without relaxing environmental, community and safety and health standards. The Prime Minister has clearly signalled that a priority for his Government this year is to significantly progress the third wave of reforms to Australia’s regulatory systems which, from the minerals industry perspective, is a severe supply capacity constraint limiting the industry’s response to the strongest global market growth in a generation.”last_img read more

first_imgThis latest safety and security-certified technology meets stringent demands for protection, risk reduction and asset availability in high-hazard industries. Schneider Electric, a global specialist in energy management and automation, has released its Tricon® CX compact system for safety and critical control applications where safe operations are critical and reliable operation is paramount. A certified ISA Secure system, the high-integrity and highly available Tricon CX ensures operational integrity, protecting against inherent risk and hazards, as well as external threats such as cyber-attack.“Safety and security have always been a top concern for our industrial clients, but now new threats, such as cyber-attack, have challenged the traditional approaches they have taken to protect and secure their people, property, communities and the environment,” said Mike Chmilewski, Vice President, process systems offer management, Schneider Electric process automation business. “Therefore, our clients demand the highest levels of safety and security to keep them safe and ensure the systems they rely on are immune to external threats. Our high-performance, future-proof Tricon CX safety system does just that. With more performance and capability, it can help clients maximise productivity, reliability and security while minimising risks and the likelihood of business interruption. It’s another example of why Schneider Electric is uniquely positioned to power the big ideas our clients need to solve their most critical issues.”The latest addition to Schneider Electric’s Triconex line of safety-instrumented systems, the Tricon CX is smaller, faster, lighter and more powerful than previous safety solutions. Its advanced functionality enables online upgrades without operational interruption. Additionally, the compact design allows for a number of new features including:Reduced form factor by 50%67% reduction in weight Lower power consumptionAdvanced monitoring and control capabilities, including:Supervised DI/DO with advanced line-performance diagnosticsFast analogue inputs with integrated HART1 ms SOE digital inputChoice of direct termination or external termination panel300% increase in controller tag capacityFive times increase in peer-to-peer performanceISA Secure EDSA level 1New automated test and verification of safety logic.“The Tricon CX safety system will enhance Schneider Electric’s current safety portfolio, and ARC believes its increased capabilities will enable new and existing customers to expand existing systems, replace obsolete systems or implement new systems,” said Larry O’Brien, Vice President, process automation, ARC Advisory Group. “Its ability to handle upgrades without interrupting the operation should give users confidence in their ability to continue to draw additional value from their investments down the road.”Through its Triconex brand, Schneider Electric offers industry-leading safety and critical control solutions for managing risks in hazardous environments. Triconex solutions enable safer operations by maximising compliance to mandated safety regulations and minimising both unscheduled downtime and the likelihood of business interruptions. The systems improve operational efficiency, helping clients achieve gains in production availability, asset uptime and ROI. Based on industry-leading Triple Modular Redundancy technology, Triconex solutions are also easy to operate and maintain, and they provide a higher total value of ownership over competitive offers.In more news, Schneider Electric has acquired LimeWare, a provider of system analysis and auditing software for Schneider Electric’s Foxboro Evo™ process automation and I/A Series® distributed control systems. The acquisition provides foxray software to help customers pinpoint and address critical industry challenges.“Acquiring LimeWare and its foxray software is an integral part of our strategy to help our customers   improve their operational integrity and operational insight, while future-proofing their operations,” said Gary Freburger, President of Schneider Electric’s process automation business. “With additional investment in our flagship process automation offerings, we have even more power to address critical challenges around safety, reliability and efficiency. The ability to more easily tackle pain points, while driving value across the entire process automation chain, is one of the big ideas we are discussing with our customers in Dallas this week, and it remains a major differentiator for our process automation business.”LimeWare was founded in 2006 and is headquartered in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Its foxray system management software complements the robust functionality of Schneider Electric’s Foxboro Evo and I/A Series process automation systems. The solution offers additional capability for configuration management, alarm management, operator action analysis and overall documentation. It includes:Change tracking with a complete change management workflow processGraphics visualisation of the control block loopsIntegrity checks to solve all DCS configuration issuesScheduled reportsAlarms and operator action management and trackingI/O and FBM spare reserve and trackingAn advance query engine that can quickly fetch any DCS information.“foxray software is the go-to tool for working with our control system database on a daily basis,” said Scott McWaters, Process Control Engineer, Hunt Refining. “From easily locating and reserving spare I/O to improved troubleshooting and insight with the ‘where used’ function, system health reporting, operator action reports, alarm history, inhibited alarm tracking and many other functions, foxray has greatly increased our efficiency. The software has been instrumental in our recent alarm rationalization efforts, and the alarm shelving tool will be used to help cut down on the number of call outs to our on-call engineers for nuisance alarm silencing. This contributes to our overall confidence in the integrity of our operation.”last_img read more

first_imgDoodle Google: André Malraux, la balle et la plumeCombattant épris de liberté et militant anti-fasciste de la première heure, André Malraux est devenu une référence de l’histoire française du XXème siècle. Le lauréat du Goncourt 1933 pour La condition humaine aurait eu 110 ans aujourd’hui. Le Doodle Google lui rend hommage.Né le 3 novembre 1901 dans le 18ème arrondissement de Paris, André Malraux est un homme qui a marqué, par ses faits d’armes, de bravoure et par sa plume, l’histoire de France contemporaine.Aventurier, autodidacte, Malraux participe tout d’abord à l’écriture d’un journal anticolonialiste en Indochine, et se fera emprisonner en 1923-1924 pour trafic d’antiquités Khmères. De ce passage, il décide d’en réaliser un livre à son retour en France, en 1930, intitulé La Voie Royale. Trois ans plus tard, il accède à une plus grande notoriété d’écrivain grâce au roman La Condition Humaine et obtient le Prix Goncourt.Militant antifaschiste, il combat, en tant que commandant España, aux coté des républicains espagnols entre 1936 et 1937. Comme pour La Voie Royale, il retire de ces affrontements un nouveau livre, L’Espoir, qui sera transposé en film en 1938.  Il entre dans la Résistance Française en 1944, devient commandant de la brigade Alsace-Lorraine, et participe à la Libération de l’Hexagone.À lire aussiÉquinoxe du Printemps : pourquoi tombe-t-il le 20 mars ?Après la guerre, il se consacre à l’écriture d’ouvrage d’Art (Le Musée imaginaire, Les voix du Silence, 1951), tout en se rapprochant du Général de Gaulle et du RPF. Il devient ministre de la Culture entre 1959 et 1969. Lors du transfert des cendres de Jean Moulin au Panthéon, il prononce une oraison funèbre mémorable, faisant du chef de la Résistance un symbole, l’image personnifié de cette lutte.André Malraux est mort le 23 novembre 1976. 20 ans plus tard, les cendres de celui qui transposait l’épée à la plume ont été déplacées au Panthéon. Il aurait eu 110 ans aujourd’hui et Google lui rend hommage sur la page d’accueil de son moteur de recherche.Le 3 novembre 2011 à 14:01 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

first_imgLimiter le réchauffement climatique à 2°C est désormais impossible, selon un expertSelon l’ex-responsable climat de l’ONU, Yvo de Boer, l’objectif de limiter le réchauffement climatique à 2°C est désormais “hors d’atteinte”. C’est pourtant ce qu’avaient promis les chefs d’Etat lors du sommet de Copenhague en décembre 2009.Yvo de Boer, ancien secrétaire exécutif de la Convention cadre sur le changement climatique de l’ONU (UNFCCC) estime que limiter le réchauffement climatique à 2°C est désormais devenu “hors d’atteinte”. Bien que les 195 membres de l’UNFCCC se soient engagés en 2009, à Copenhague, à limiter la hausse de la température du globe à deux degrés Celsius, cet objectif ne pourra pas être atteint.À lire aussiDengue : symptômes, traitement, prévention, où en est-on ?”Les deux degrés sont perdus mais cela ne signifie pas pour moi qu’il faut les oublier [ … ] parce que l’objectif fait référence à la tentative de limiter un certain nombre d’impacts” du réchauffement climatique, a cependant souligné M. de Boer, interrogé par l’AFP. “Il faudrait donc maintenant voir comment nous pouvons nous rapprocher le plus possible des 2 degrés et ne pas dire que nous devons tout reprendre à zéro pour formuler un nouvel objectif”, a-t-il ajouté.Certains chercheurs estiment que les deux degrés mentionnés sont un mirage politique dans la mesure où l’augmentation de la température moyenne de la planète se dirige plutôt vers 3°C au bas mot. De plus, avec l’explosion du prix du pétrole, les économies émergentes se sont repliées sur le charbon, le carburant fossile le plus producteur de CO2. Autant de signes qui indiquent que la planète est aujourd’hui bien mal engagée.Le 28 mars 2012 à 17:22 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

first_imgOLYMPIA — Industrial hemp would be allowed to be grown in Washington state under a measure passed by the Senate.Senate Bill 5012 received unanimous support Wednesday in the Senate and now heads to the House for consideration. The measure authorizes the growing of industrial hemp as an agricultural activity in the state. It also directs Washington State University to study industrial hemp production in the state, with a report due to the Legislature by Jan. 14, 2016.Hemp, like marijuana, comes from the cannabis plant but has much less THC, the active ingredient in marijuana that makes people high. Washington voters passed Initiative 502 in November 2012 to legalize and regulate the recreational use of pot by adults over 21, and the first state-licensed pot stores opened last summer.last_img read more

first_imgTime Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes said during an earnings call this morning that the company will incur a $100 million charge during the fourth quarter as it begins a restructuring of Time Inc., primarily in respect to its news group. He said the restructuring will be “more targeted” in comparison to the massive changes that were made this time last year, resulting in around 600 layoffs. In New York, this year’s round of layoffs could total 280, according to a filing with the New York State Department of Labor. When contacted by FOLIO:, a Time Inc. spokesperson called the Department of Labor number an estimate that the company is required to provide the state. She also said that while layoffs will be associated with the restructuring, no official headcount has been determined as the company is aiming to save a specific amount of money. The number of layoffs, she said, will depend on how many people accept voluntary buyouts. It has been rumored for weeks that more staffing cuts were coming this year at Time Inc. Layoffs reportedly began Tuesday night at Sports Illustrated where approximately 15 to 20 sales and marketing staffers were let go. Time Inc. executives were said to have asked for an “emergency” meeting with representatives from the Newspaper Guild to discuss layoffs. Bewkes during the call also said the company will take a look at some of Time Inc.’s “less profitable” titles. The company Wednesday shut down Fortune Small Business, a controlled circ. publication it published for American Express. The spokesperson told FOLIO: “none of the traditional U.S.” Time Inc. titles are closing.Advertising revenue at Time Inc. was reported at $456 million during the third quarter, a 22 percent drop from $585 million the same period in 2008. Subscription revenue fell 13 percent to $333 million.During the call, Time Warner CFO John Martin said he expects Time Inc. profits during the fourth quarter will still be down but will show improvement. Some categories, he said, including food, auto and beauty, are showing growth.Time Warner reported an operating income of $3.76 billion through the first nine months, a decrease of roughly 7 percent from the same period last year. Revenues were $20.88 billion, also down about 7 percent.Meanwhile, the company reported Time Inc. operating income of $167 million through the third quarter, down nearly 65 percent from the same period last year. Revenues fell 21 percent to $2.63 billion. Operating income during the third quarter fell dramatically—a 40 percent decrease to $97 million, on $914 million in revenues.last_img read more

first_imgThe Sitka Pioneer Home was the first such facility. It and others in Ketchikan, Juneau, Anchorage, Palmer and Fairbanks have lost staff due to budget cuts. (Photo by Emily Kwong, KCAW – Sitka)Alaska’s Pioneer Homes have stopped accepting new residents, at least for a while. It’s one more impact of state budget cuts.Listen nowThe state’s six homes usually serve about 440-450 Alaskans at any given time.State Pioneer Homes Division Director Vickie Wilson said reduced funding is dropping that number by about 30, or 7 percent.“They are beds that we are not filling because we don’t have adequate staff to be able to ensure good, safe care,” she said.Wilson’s agency has lost 30 positions, mostly because of attrition. And since senior care is labor-intensive, fewer people can be housed.That means the homes, three in Southeast and three in the Railbelt, can no longer accept new residents in the highest category of care. It’s called Level 3, and it’s pretty much like a nursing home, with 24-hour, hands-on assistance.Jacque Farnsworth and Jack Brandt play for JuneauPioneer Home residents earlier this year. (Photo by Lisa Phu, KTOO – Juneau)“Right at the moment, it’s all six of them. No one’s taking any of the level 3s right at this point,” she said.More than half of all residents, and a large number of applicants, are in that category. Two lower levels, different types of assisted-living care, require less staffing.Wilson said seniors seeking such care might have a chance to get a bed. But, probably not right away.“We would look carefully at their level of care and see if we could manage them with the staff that we have,” she said.“This is devastating,” said Ann Secrest, communications director for the Alaska branch of AARP, a nationwide senior advocacy group.She said Alaskans are living longer and staying at home as late as they can. But there comes a time when more care is required. So pioneer home cuts remove a much-needed option.“The majority of individuals are cared for at home. There are approximately 120,000 and 128,000 Alaskans who serve as unpaid family caregivers. So there’s going to be more of a burden put on those unpaid family caregivers throughout the state,” she said.Alaska, overall, falls far short of providing the care its seniors desire.Alaska Commission on Aging member Mary Shields said that’s in part because of demographics.The Ketchikan Pioneer Home is one of six in Alaska caring for older residents. (Photo by KRBD)“We have the fastest growing senior population in the nation, by percentage. There’s nothing much we can do about that,” she said.She said it’s no surprise pioneer homes are facing cutbacks. But she objects to those who say reductions don’t have to affect services.“Some people call it the low-hanging fruit. I don’t. We’ve already cut all of that off. We’re now into the mid-level branches,” she said.Residents, or their families, do pay for part of their care. Charges run from about $2,500 to $7,000 per month.The state considered turning the homes over to the private sector to save money. But it’s dropped that idea, though services such as pharmacies could still be privatized.Of course, beds open up as residents die. Pioneer Homes Director Wilson said 20 to 25 percent of beds become available each year.That could allow more new residents in. But Wilson said that’s only if funding remains the same.“Being a realist, as we take cuts, we will continue to have to consider that more beds will have to be cut,” she said.Even in better times, it’s hard to get into a pioneer home. As of mid-summer, close to 600 people were on the active waiting list.The inactive list, those waiting until they’re in greater need, is much larger.last_img read more

first_imgStudents blocks Dhaka-Barishal highway at Nathullabad area protesting death of 7 people including a BM College student in road accident. Photo: SaiyanStudents of Government BM College protested on Saturday, demanding maximum penalty for the bus driver involved in Friday’s road accident in Barishal which left seven people dead, reports UNB.One of the victims was an MA student of the college.Agitated students blocked the Dhaka-Barishal Highway for about two hours, halting traffic on the busy road. They brought out a procession from the campus before putting up barricades on the highway at Notullabad around 10am.Police visited the spot and requested the protesters to end their demonstration, said Nurul Islam, officer-in-charge of Kotwali police station.The students called off their protests after Barishal City mayor Sher Niabat Sadik Abdulla assured them that justice will be done, the OC added.Seven people, including Shila Haldar, 24, an MA student, were killed after a bus of ‘Durjoy Paribahan’ hit a human hauler in city’s Tetultala area on Friday morning.last_img read more

first_imgRohingya refugees gather near the fence in the “no man’s land” zone between Myanmar and Bangladesh border as seen from Maungdaw, Rakhine state on 24 August, 2018. Photo: AFPBangladesh has raised question over the role of the United Nations in the Rohingya repatriation process at a meeting of stakeholders on Thursday.The international body has done little to address the problems in Myanmar, complained the foreign ministry’s national taskforce on Rohingya at the meeting. The meeting, held at the foreign ministry, observed that the international communities must ensure that a safe environment is created in Myanmar’s Rakhaine province before repatriating the Rohingyas there.The UN, however, is not even being able to work there.Moreover, the meeting maintained that the Rohingyas who earlier took shelter in India were also entering Bangladesh but the UN bodies remain silent on the issue.Representatives of UN bodies along with government officials attended the meeting presided over by foreign secretary Md Shahidul Haque.At least four higher officials criticised the role of UN saying that they always pointed their finger at Bangladesh whenever the issue of repatriation came to the fore.However, the activities of UN in North Rakhaine has come to a virtual halt ince last November and no UN officials are present there at the moment, the Bangladeshi officials said.A foreign ministry official pointed out that the UN has not said anything although several hundred Rohingya refugees entered Bangladesh over the last one and half months.       He also said that Rohingyas are still slipping in from Myanmar.Local officials said 468 Rohingya refugees of 111 families have taken shelter in Cox’s Bazar’s Ukhia in first ten days of this month. They all have come from India.The UN representatives also discussed fresh violence in Myanmar. The UN has made a draft plan to outlay USD 921 million to the refugees and the local Bangladeshis in current fiscal year, said the Rohingya, Relief and Repatriation Commission’s (RRRC) commissioner Mohammed Abul Kalam Azad after the meeting.The plan might be officially declared in February following scrutiny, he said.Moreover, the development partners have promised to disburse USD 117 million more in another specialised project.last_img read more

first_imgListen Share 00:00 /01:09 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Rendering courtesy of UH-DowntownOfficials with UH-Downtown say the property, which is located north of I-10, is the preferred location for a planned Science and Technology building.The University of Houston System’s Board of Regents has approved the purchase of a 17 acre parcel of land located near downtown Houston, which can be very important for the expansion of UH-Downtown.The property is located on the north side of I-10.UH-Downtown has been interested in buying it since the 1990s and the land will grow their campus to approximately 40 acres.David Bradley, vice president for Administration and Finance at UH-Downtown, says the purchase will help them broaden their master plan.Bradley adds the site is the preferred location to build a science and technology building, a project which has already gotten a green light from the Texas Legislature.The land can also help UH-Downtown to pursue other possibilities.“We have a small student life center right now and we’d like to get something that’s more appropriate for a campus our size, perhaps a new student union building one day… So, there are a number of things out there that this land will enable us to look at seriously,” Bradley notes.The new property may also help UH-Downtown grow its enrollment.“Currently, UH-Downtown has 14,000 students and our strategic plan calls for the university to grow to 18,000 students by 2020,” Bradley adds. “We believe this additional property will really help us in that regard. Xlast_img read more

first_imgWASHINGTON — Well before the nation’s first total solar eclipse dominated the headlines of every news organization in America, it was affixed to the mind of Jamese Sims.Jamese Sims meterologist, engineer, and scientist for NOAA pictured with the Goes-16. (Photo courtesy/scijinks.gov)Sims, a native of Meridian, Miss., graduate of two historically black universities and one of the few African-American women in the field of scientific engineering and meteorology, is part of the reason you and millions of Americans could see the stunning images of the eclipse on broadcast news stations, web pages, Facebook and Twitter feeds.A graduate of Jackson State University in Jackson, Miss., and Howard University in Washington, D.C., Sims is the product manager for the groundbreaking GOES-16 Satellite that provided the images of the eclipse millions of Americans saw.  More….last_img read more

first_img Explore further © 2013 Phys.org ‘Apocalyptic’ smog eases in Chinese city Citation: Chinese to test electrostatic smog cleaning concept in a park (2013, October 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-chinese-electrostatic-smog-concept.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde has announced at Dutch Design Week, that he’s forged an agreement with Chinese officials to test a system he’s designed to clear smog from a small portion of the sky. Roosegaarde, with Studio Roosgaarde, is known for coming up with innovative design ideas that are good for both people and the environment. His latest idea involves embedding copper coils in the ground and running high voltage, low amp electricity through them to create an electrostatic charge strong enough to pull down smog particles in the air. Roosegaarde reported that he and his team have already built a running mock-up of the system at an indoor facility. There they are using the coils in a 5 x 5 meter smog filled room to create a 1 cubic meter round hole in the center that is free of smog. He likens the technology to the static electricity that occurs when people rub a balloon on their heads. With his system, the electrostatic charge would attract soot and other particles in the air in the immediate vicinity, making the air much easier to breathe.China, as most have heard, has been experiencing serious smog problems as coal fired electricity producing power plants release massive amounts of particles that sometimes cover cities in a haze that is both difficult to see through, and hazardous to health. The situation has at times become dire, Roosegaarde told those at the meeting, forcing officials to admit, albeit off the record, that something needs to be done in the short term, while long term plans are in the making. He disclosed that officials have granted him permission to install one of his systems in a public park in Beijing. It won’t happen right away of course, Roosegaarde and his team have to test a bigger system to work out the true design, and to make sure it will work outdoors. He insists the system will be safe, even for people walking directly over the coils.The coil system by Roosegaarde, even if it works exactly as planned won’t be the solution to the extreme smog problems in China, of course, but it might offer those in the area at least a temporary respite. If successful, it’s likely many such systems would be installed— Roosegaarde claims that the size of the hole in the smog is limited only by the amount of power sent through the coils.last_img read more

first_img Information Technology View all 220 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Satoshi Minoshima, M.D., Ph.D., chairman of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Scientific Committee, discusses the new technologies and trends at SNMMI 2014. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Women’s Health View all 62 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Videos | Nuclear Imaging | June 19, 2014 SNMMI: Trends and New Technology in Nuclear Imaging Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:55Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:55 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.”center_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Technology Reports View all 9 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology.last_img read more